Summit 2003

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 Summit 2003
Two ski-equipped "Hercules" LC-130H and 1 C-130 aircraft from New York Air National Guard 109th Airlift Wing on the tarmac in Kangerlussuaq airport. The aircraft crews are US Air Force.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
3 Summit 2003
Passengers bound for Summit board the Hercules LC-130H in Kangerlussuaq.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
5 Summit 2003
Onboard the Hercules cargo and passengers share the space. The 700 km (c. 2 hours) flight between Kangerlussuaq and Summit offers limited comfort and a high noise level. The cargo compartment length is 12.5m, width 2.74m and height 2.74m.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
6 Summit 2003
The immensity of the ice cap is apparent en route from Kangerlussuaq to Summit, the highest ice sheet location on Earth.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
7 Summit 2003
The LC-130H aircraft has a crew of five: 2 pilots, 1 navigator, 1 flight engineer and 1 loadmaster. See aircraft technical information at http://www.aerotechnews.com/phtoarc/webphot/C130/C130.html.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
9 Summit 2003
On ground at Summit, located at 72°36'N / 38°30'W and 3,254 m above sea level. Because of the high latitude and Earth's rotation the "effective altitude" is c. 3500 m asl.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
10 Summit 2003
This photo was taken in August, 2000, from a Twin Otter circling overhead while on approach to Summit. The buildings are spread apart to minimize drifting, which is a major problem. Most of the camp activity revolves aroung the Big House and the Green House. In 2000 Scientific research is conducted at the Swiss Tower and Science Trench, which border the clean air zone. In 2003 additional research and monitoring sites are active at Summit.
Source: www.summitcamp.org
72 Summit 2003
Summit as seen towards the southeast. Tent city in foreground. In the background the "golf ball" on top of the Big House.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
31 Summit 2003
Downtown Summit seen towards the southwest.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
19 Summit 2003
The "Big House" serves as the central hub of camp during the summer season, housing the kitchen and dining facilites. People congregate there during the day and evening before retiring to their sleeping quarters. In addition to the social aspects, the satellite communications link and other radio gear are located in the building. During the winter over period, the building provides a haven away from primary berthing quarters for the crew members.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
83 Summit 2003
The Big House is regularly kept cleared from snow by the action of heavy-duty equipment. Compare the present level of the house to the present level where the tents are pitched. The vertical difference is equivalent to 12 months' snow accumulation. Every other year the Big House is moved upwards 2m, using the integrated jack system.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
84 Summit 2003
The Big House is regularly kept cleared from snow by the action of heavy-duty equipment. Compare the present level of the house to the present level where the tent is pitched. The vertical difference is equivalent to 12 months' snow accumulation. Every other year the Big House is moved upwards 2m, using the integrated jack system.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
11 Summit 2003
Logistician is breefing newly arrived visitors about activities at Summit.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
24 Summit 2003
The interior of the Big House with kitchen, dishing and cleaning section in the far end and the relaxation / entertainment section to the right.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
25 Summit 2003
The interior of the Big House with kitchen, dishing and cleaning section in the far end and the relaxation / entertainment section to the right.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center