Summit 2003

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6
75 Summit 2003
The Big House is the central hub. Satellite communications link and other radio gear are located in the building and antennas on top of it.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
76 Summit 2003
The emergency sled, ready for hook-up by a snowmobile, is always parked outside the Big House prepared with necessary gear to apply first aid should any emergency situation arise anywhere at Summit.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
77 Summit 2003
One of the two outhouses at Summit. The black-flagged pole next to the outhouse marks one out of four sites where outdoor peeing is allowed. Only a strictly enforced "yellow snow policy" can hinder a conflict of interests with required "clean snow" areas for science.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
55 Summit 2003
The new (installed during 2002) berthing unit accommodating some of the Summit staff. Holds no toilet facility, outhouse is partly visible behind building.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
26 Summit 2003
"Tent City". During the summer season, most of the site crew and researchers sleep outside in tents called Arctic Ovens. These double-walled tents house one person and their gear. Although they are unheated, the tents quickly warm up when the sun is shining.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
69 Summit 2003
Heavy-duty, insulated, double wall, cotton tents with board floor are suitable one-person night quarters during the summer season.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
18 Summit 2003
The "Green House" has served as the primary living quarters for the winter over crew. Has kitchen and plumbing facilities. Most of the building is now converted into lab space.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
54 Summit 2003
The Green House was installed at Summit in 1997. It is composed of several modules and functioned until 2001 as the home for the winter over team. Now partly converted into small labs.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
98 Summit 2003
Technician checks climate registration hardware mounted above the Green House.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
32 Summit 2003
The Green House with outlying clean air / clean snow research sites (fed by power lines). Small black structure in front is an outhouse.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
28 Summit 2003
The skiway (visible by marker flags) runs for 4,500 m (and is 60 m wide), in NE-SW direction at the edge of Summit. A large amount of attention is placed on keeping the skiway plowed, packed and groomed. So far, the existence of Summit depends entirely on aircraft being able to land.
© H. Thing / Danish Polar Center
C130onSkiway
A Hercules LC-130H using the 4,500 m long skiway at Summit. A large amount of attention is placed on keeping the skiway plowed, packed and groomed. So far, the existence of Summit depends entirely on aircraft being able to land.
Source: www.summitcamp.org
CombatUnload
Cargo is delivered to Summit on large pallets by Hercules LC-130H. The pallets can be combat offloaded, meaning that as the aircraft is moving along the skiway, the pallets are pushed out the back.
Source: www.summitcamp.org
CargoBerm
To prevent stored cargo from becoming buried by the drifting snow, pallets are placed onto the top of large berms.
Source: www.summitcamp.org
C130fuel
Fuel is stored in large bladders at Summit. Arriving C-130'ies are often loaded with excess fuel, which is then transferred into the bladders. During summer, the entire winter over fuel supply must be delivered and stored.
Source: www.summitcamp.org